Does Learning Specific Features for Related Parts Help Human Pose Estimation?

Wei Tang, Ying Wu; The IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), 2019, pp. 1107-1116

Abstract


Human pose estimation (HPE) is inherently a homogeneous multi-task learning problem, with the localization of each body part as a different task. Recent HPE approaches universally learn a shared representation for all parts, from which their locations are linearly regressed. However, our statistical analysis indicates not all parts are related to each other. As a result, such a sharing mechanism can lead to negative transfer and deteriorate the performance. This potential issue drives us to raise an interesting question. Can we identify related parts and learn specific features for them to improve pose estimation? Since unrelated tasks no longer share a high-level representation, we expect to avoid the adverse effect of negative transfer. In addition, more explicit structural knowledge, e.g., ankles and knees are highly related, is incorporated into the model, which helps resolve ambiguities in HPE. To answer this question, we first propose a data-driven approach to group related parts based on how much information they share. Then a part-based branching network (PBN) is introduced to learn representations specific to each part group. We further present a multi-stage version of this network to repeatedly refine intermediate features and pose estimates. Ablation experiments indicate learning specific features significantly improves the localization of occluded parts and thus benefits HPE. Our approach also outperforms all state-of-the-art methods on two benchmark datasets, with an outstanding advantage when occlusion occurs.

Related Material


[pdf] [supp]
[bibtex]
@InProceedings{Tang_2019_CVPR,
author = {Tang, Wei and Wu, Ying},
title = {Does Learning Specific Features for Related Parts Help Human Pose Estimation?},
booktitle = {The IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR)},
month = {June},
year = {2019}
}