What is the Most Efficient Way to Select Nearest Neighbor Candidates for Fast Approximate Nearest Neighbor Search?

Masakazu Iwamura, Tomokazu Sato, Koichi Kise; The IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2013, pp. 3535-3542

Abstract


Approximate nearest neighbor search (ANNS) is a basic and important technique used in many tasks such as object recognition. It involves two processes: selecting nearest neighbor candidates and performing a brute-force search of these candidates. Only the former though has scope for improvement. In most existing methods, it approximates the space by quantization. It then calculates all the distances between the query and all the quantized values (e.g., clusters or bit sequences), and selects a fixed number of candidates close to the query. The performance of the method is evaluated based on accuracy as a function of the number of candidates. This evaluation seems rational but poses a serious problem; it ignores the computational cost of the process of selection. In this paper, we propose a new ANNS method that takes into account costs in the selection process. Whereas existing methods employ computationally expensive techniques such as comparative sort and heap, the proposed method does not. This realizes a significantly more efficient search. We have succeeded in reducing computation times by one-third compared with the state-of-theart on an experiment using 100 million SIFT features.

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[bibtex]
@InProceedings{Iwamura_2013_ICCV,
author = {Iwamura, Masakazu and Sato, Tomokazu and Kise, Koichi},
title = {What is the Most Efficient Way to Select Nearest Neighbor Candidates for Fast Approximate Nearest Neighbor Search?},
booktitle = {The IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV)},
month = {December},
year = {2013}
}